Langarth

Frequently Asked Questions

Whilst we’ve done our utmost to provide a rounded overview of the Pydar project on this website, we do still receive questions on the development, find below the more commonly asked queries.

What is a garden village?

A garden village is a new settlement which offers high-quality homes, jobs, community facilities and services in an attractive, landscape-led setting.

It provides everything people need for a new community to thrive such as schools, medical centres, transport, green spaces and shops.

Langarth will be a well-connected community with the health and happiness of its residents at its core. It is part of the Government’s Garden Communities Programme. This means a community with local character, strong services, integrated, accessible transport and green spaces.

Garden Village projects receive a tailored package of Government support.

Why can’t the Langarth area be left as a green field site?

The site is allocated for housing in the Cornwall Local Plan. Planning permissions already exist for homes on this site. This means it is inevitable significant development will take place in the future. We will work with the local community and key partners to create a coordinated new community for residents, workers and visitors.

This will provide high quality homes, employment, leisure and community spaces as well as local retail and services.

Why is the Council intervening in this development?

We recognise the concerns from the local community over the development of the Langarth site.

These include the quality of the new homes, the impact on existing traffic congestion on the A390 and increased pressures on local schools and health services.

We want to prevent these developments coming forward on an uncoordinated basis.

We want to develop a coherent masterplan for the development. This will set higher standards for placemaking and design in the area.

This will ensure the scheme provides a sustainable community, a more attractive place to live and good quality homes serving Truro.

Our aim is to create a vibrant and distinctive new community at Langarth. It will have walkable neighbourhoods, sustainable transport and generous, high quality green spaces.

There will also be access to shops, facilities and meeting places. A place where people want to live, not just a series of housing estates.

This scheme will create high quality, well designed housing and, in addition, improved infrastructure, spaces for work and services that fit the needs of a diverse population.

The scheme will provide key services at the start of the project rather than the end. These include; the link road, new schools, an extension to the park and ride scheme, health, leisure, play, faith, emergency facilities and a new community centre.

What is an Environmental Impact Assessment?

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a statutory process. It identifies and assesses significant effects likely to arise from any possible development.
It helps the Planning Authority understand the potential impacts of any significant development. Environmental assessments provide a guide to the scale and design of the development.

The planning application will include an environmental statement. This provides evidence to help guide the development. It will also help develop a series of "parameter plans".

These plans set a framework for identifying key elements including, for example, what areas can be built on, the heights of buildings and landscape areas.

This will ensure the environmental impact is acceptable.

What is the purpose of the Scoping report for an Environmental Impact Assessment?

A Scoping report identifies key issues which need to be addressed in the planning application, and is an important part of the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Developers identify the issues they feel are important, and they request the Council’s opinion on these. The Council as planning authority seeks advice from national agencies, such as Historic England or the Environment agency and then issues a formal Opinion. This ensures the planning application includes an assessment of all the relevant issues.

The site is close to several historic features, so how will they be protected?

The scoping exercise will provide guidance on the potential impacts on key features that will be addressed in the planning application. Often this can be achieved through the production of ‘parameter plans’. These plans also set out how to avoid or mitigate these impacts. Developers work with Councils and other statutory agencies to produce these.

This may mean for example, not allowing development in certain areas or limiting the height of buildings that may affect views of particular features.

There is already a high degree of protection of historic features in the planning system which the planning application will need to adhere to.

These "parameter "plans form part of the assessment of any planning application. They also provide a framework, or limit for the development in the future.

How will you protect the environment?

We recognise the importance of protecting the environment and wildlife. We want to create a new place with green infrastructure at its heart.

The scheme includes redesigning the road through the site as a tree-lined avenue.

There will be sports pitches and public open spaces for play and recreation walkable green corridors. Cycleways and pedestrian walkways.

There will also be improved surface water drainage. New ponds, wetlands and swales will increase biodiversity and protect and enhance species.

We are working with the Environment Agency, Natural England, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and the local community.

What about traffic congestion?

Our emerging vision sees a place which prioritises people over cars. We want to integrate green spaces to grow the environment. We will encourage healthy living through social interaction, play, walking and cycling. We will fail to make this a properly sustainable place if the new residents choose to drive to the city centre. People can cycle or use public transport to travel into Truro and its major employment and commercial hubs . We are working with partners to create an effective Transport Strategy. This will provide better cycle, bus and walking connections. We want to provide alternatives to car use for accessing the city centre and other services.

The Northern Access Road will be an “avenue” style of road. This will include trees, cycle paths and on street parking rather than a standard estate road. It will be pedestrian friendly, with a 20 mph speed limit in all possible circumstances. The masterplan will encourage electric vehicles and public to promote good air quality.

What about the impact on drainage/flooding?

We want to create an enhanced surface water drainage system, consisting of new ponds, wetlands and swales. This will use the natural characteristics of the environment to slow, store and clean water.

These surface water drainage features will help increase biodiversity and protect and enhance species.

What kind of homes will you build?

This site is allocated for housing in the Cornwall Local Plan and houses will be built whether the Council is involved or not. Our involvement will provide improved housing design and placemaking .

We want to create a new vibrant, well-connected community for between 8,000 and 10,000 future residents of Cornwall.

This will include local character, strong services, integrated and accessible transport and green spaces.

The design of the homes will be guided by design principles and the masterplan. Design codes will influence the materials used, the range of house types and consideration for local character.

The aim is for homes to be low carbon, low running costs – fit for future living.

This scheme will enable us to act as a Community Leader.

It will create high quality, well designed housing, infrastructure, space for work and services that fit the needs of a diverse population.

Why up to 4,000 new homes?

The reference of up to 4000 homes is the figure used to scope the Environmental Impact Assessment for the area. The number is not a proposal or a change in current planning policy but is used to test the long term implications of development.

In earlier reports and communications Cornwall Council has quoted that the developments at Langarth will provide about 2,700 homes. This number comes from the approximate number of homes that were anticipated in the planning permissions already granted in this area. However, the current permissions contain areas of large out of town shopping which is now less likely to be deliverable and would potentially harm the City centre.

Cornwall Council has decided that it needs to intervene and coordinate the development, because of its size and importance. This will ensure that we can create a distinctive community at Langarth on the edge of the city of Truro where people will live, work and thrive.

We know that many people in Truro (and throughout) Cornwall are struggling to get on the housing ladder. Langarth already has permission for housing, but we’re working with Truro City and Kenwyn Parish Councils to implement their Neighbourhood Plan principles and create a vibrant, connected, well planned community for between 8,000 and 10,000 future residents. At least 35% of the homes will be affordable. There will be homes for older people and those with special needs, as well as homes for key workers, students, and good quality Council Owned market rented homes.

Langarth Garden Village will be a place with local character, services and facilities, integrated and accessible transport and plentiful green spaces.

In doing this review, it is recognised that some of the out of town shopping areas may be more appropriately used for housing or other local facilities. If that were to happen, this would affect the likely scale of the development over the longer term.

How much affordable housing will there be?

We want Langarth Garden Village to be a garden community for everyone. It will provide a wide range of homes for people of all needs and aspirations.

There will be a mix of housing sizes, types and tenures to meet local needs. Not a bland “one size fits all” approach.

This includes: 35% affordable housing, extra care, self-build, key worker accommodation and good quality Council Owned market rented homes.

What does the Cornwall Local Plan say?

As we know from the existing Local Plan Truro and Threemilestone is a focus for both housing and employment growth to meet local needs, with approximately 3,900 homes expected to be built by 2030 across the broader area of the city. The development at Langarth will form part of that mix to 2030 and beyond. We want to make sure that the infrastructure needed to support this community is planned robustly to respond to be able to change into the long term.

Any decision about the total number of homes in a subsequent planning application that will eventually be built will be the subject of the Council’s normal planning process. We have not taken any decision at this time, and we are working with the community to masterplan the area and support the development of the Neighbourhood Plan by the City Council. These will set the framework for the growth coming forward in the future.

How can we be sure that housing numbers at Langarth won’t just keep creeping up?

It is our intention to create a thriving, sustainable community at Langarth. A community where residents have access to great local facilities, infrastructure and services. We will fix the number of homes to be delivered at Langarth early on. This will inform the Master-planning process. Work to confirm numbers is currently underway.

Will Langarth Garden Village create jobs?

We recognise the need for jobs. We will work with partners to provides extra employment opportunities.

This includes specific support for start-ups and growth for small and medium sized enterprises.

We will seek to complement, rather than duplicate existing work and retail provision. We are in conversation with local stakeholders to ensure this.

What about the impact on health facilities?

We are aware of the impact of new developments on health infrastructure. Investment in new health facilities will take place at the start of the development when needed.

The Truro primary care practices are looking at options for increasing provision. These include a new medical centre on the site. They are also considering alternative methods for delivering primary and community based services.

We are working with NHS Kernow and the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust to minimise the impact of the development on the acute hospital and emergency services.

What about the impact on schools?

By planning this new community as a whole we can ensure school provision matches the need created by the new homes. We will work with existing schools and learning providers and consider what extra provision is needed at Langarth.

What about the impact on the city centre?

We recognise the potential negative impact of out of town shops on the city and other local centres.

The current permissions on the site include proposals for large out of town retail units. By leading on the development of the Masterplan, the Council has the opportunity to remove or reduce further out of town shopping and replace them with more sustainable development which supports local needs.

Even a small number of large out of town units could lead to some poor quality shopping in a sea of car parking.

This could harm the city centre and undermine good urban design and place making. Large out of town retail units are geared towards car-based traffic on the A390. They will not meet the day to day needs of existing local residents or the new housing.

Our involvement will help prevent the construction of these large out of town units. The out of town shopping will be replaced with local retail and other services and facilities which meet the needs of the local community as part of the emerging Masterplan.

We need to ensure the scheme connects with existing settlements, the Royal Truro Hospital, Truro and Penwith College as well as existing and planned retail developments in the rest of Truro.

What about the impact on Threemilestone?

The Council and Masterplanning team are working with existing communities. This is both via the Stakeholder Panel and via meetings and events. This will prevent duplicating what already exists within surrounding communities.

How will residents of Threemilestone safely cross the A390 and vice versa?

We recognise the importance of providing safe crossings for pedestrians and cyclists across the A390. This will form part of the Masterplan. Options are currently being explored to achieve this.

Why is the Neighbourhood Plan being updated?

Neighbourhood Plans need to be kept up to date. Nearly three years later there have been local and national changes that mean that the plan needs to be updated.

These reasons include: Thinking how we can respond to Climate Change; Opportunities to help re-plan major new developments at Langarth and Pydar Street; A need to make improvements to health and wellbeing; Creation of a greener city and encouraging more sustainable ways to travel.

There is also a need for new policies to meet specific issues and planning needs for the area. There have been some significant changes since the plan was adopted.

These include proposals to improve the quality of development at Langarth and redevelopment proposals for the former Carrick offices at Pydar Street. Cornwall and Truro City Councils have also declared Climate Change Emergencies. Changing the current plan will help guide these major developments .

It will also promote better energy efficiency, drainage and other environmental standards for new buildings and places.

Why does the Neighbourhood Plan need to include Langarth?

Langarth is one of the biggest sets of planning permissions for Truro and Kenwyn. It will be the biggest source of new housing to meet housing needs in the area.

The permissions have not yet been brought forward and this is causing uncertainty. It also provides opportunities to consider how the development can best meet local needs in the future.

Adding policies specifically about Langarth will help clarify what the community expects from the new development in terms of quality. It will also look at how it can best fit with local housing needs and become a more sustainable place to live and work.

The revised Neighbourhood Plan is the best place for these new policies to be set. It will help guide the development of the masterplan and new planning applications at Langarth.

What happens to the existing Neighbourhood Plan?

The existing neighbourhood plan will remain in place until the new policies are inspected. Most of the revisions being made are small minor changes with a small number of new policies. The existing plan is considered to still be up to date and the changes being made will not reduce its strength in planning decisions.

Cornwall has declared a Climate Emergency. How will Langarth Garden Village reflect this?

It is our intention to create a well-connected community that is adaptable, resilient and fit for future living. A community that sits within a biodiverse and hard-working landscape. We are looking to create something exemplary. We will draw on the vast bank of knowledge, skills and experience that exist within Cornwall and beyond, to make that happen.

What is the current position with the Stadium for Cornwall?

Planning Applications: the Cornish Pirates Ltd has submitted applications to discharge all the pre-commencement planning conditions. A decision is due from Cornwall Council Planning Authority in September 2019. A Reserved Matters (RM) application has also been submitted. This will provide further detail on access, layout, landscaping, scale and appearance to reflect design development changes since the last RM in 2012.

Land – The stadium land is currently owned by Exemplar/Inox . It will be passed to Cornwall Council via the Langarth Section 106 agreement. Cornwall Council is currently considering an application to amend the section 106 agreement . This application is expected to be approved and the amended agreement signed later this year. At that point it is proposed the land will be transferred to the Cornish Pirates Ltd.

Funding – The final £3m funds is subject to a Business Case to Central Government. The Pirates have been liaising with Sport England who are working on behalf of the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. The Cornwall Council business case was submitted to Government in July 2018. The Pirates have since provided further detailed information.

This includes a sustainable ten-year Business Plan to show the stadium can continue in business and outreach information to identify the target markets to increase physical activity in Cornwall.

This information has been well received by Sport England. We believe it has been recommended to Dept DCMS and HM Treasury for funding. We are waiting a funding announcement.

Sport Cornwall Foundation – Cornish Pirates Ltd cannot receive grants to promote physical activity. Sport Cornwall Foundation, standalone charitable organisation, has been set up to fulfil this role. The Foundation will run the outreach programme with events across Cornwall. This includes sports festivals at the Stadium.

Is it all about rugby?

No. The Stadium for Cornwall will become the home ground of the Cornish Pirates Ltd and the Truro City Football Club. Football will usually be played on a Saturday and rugby on Sunday. Both clubs will have practice grounds elsewhere. This means they will not play on the pitch Monday to Friday except for weekly half day sessions.

There will be a public gym and dance studio on the ground floor of the west stand.

The pitch will be available for hire for community events.

The stadium has planning permission to hold up to nine large non sporting events each year, e.g. concerts.

Truro and Penwith College will have its training kitchens and business centre on the first floor of the west stand.

There will be a 500 person capacity conference centre on the second floor overlooking the pitch.

What will the capacity of the stadium be?

Phase 1 will have a capacity of over 6,000 spectators (west and south stands). Later phases (east and north stands) will take capacity to the consented 10,000 spectators.

Where will everybody park?

The principle of the Stadium for Cornwall has always been to make maximum use of the Truro Park and Ride. There are 1,200 spaces at Langarth (and 600 space extension planned) and 1,350 spaces at Tregurra with buses linking via Truro Railway Station. This means the Stadium is well placed to control spectator parking.

The Cornish Pirates must submit a detailed Match Day Access Strategy to Cornwall’s Planning Authority for approval before the Stadium comes into use.

What about the traffic?

The Stadium for Cornwall will have matchdays on Saturdays, Sundays and occasional weekday evenings. The maximum traffic flows will be outside the normal peak traffic times in Truro and when the Park and Ride sites have low use or have historically been closed.

Isn’t the Park and Ride closed on Sundays and evenings?

It has been to date. But Cornwall Council has planning approval to extend the operating hours of both Langarth and Tregurra sites. This will serve both the Royal Cornwall Hospital Treliske and the Stadium for Cornwall.

When will work on the Stadium for Cornwall begin?

This is a difficult question to answer. The Cornish Pirates have to wait for Government funding to be confirmed. It also needs the land to be transferred from Inox to Cornwall Council. Once this has taken place Cornish Pirates can tender the construction work. This has to be done to comply with its public funding obligations.

How long will it take to build?

At this stage we anticipate the build to take approximately 18 months. As we near the commencement of the development this time-frame will become more specific and detailed.

Who will approve the venue for use?

Cornwall Council will play a key role in certifying and licencing the Stadium for Cornwall. The Council leads the safety group that certifies stadia as safe to use. This means working with Devon and Cornwall Constabulary and Cornwall Fire and Rescue.

I would like to buy a home how do I do that?

Please get in touch by email or phone, and a member of the team will add you to our database. It is unlikely that homes will be launching in the next two years, but we will be happy to contact you as soon as plans have progressed to that stage.

What is Pydar?

Pydar is an exciting and ambitious Cornwall Council led project to transform an underused site in the heart of Truro into a dynamic, inclusive community hub with green spaces, new affordable homes for local people, cutting-edge innovation and businesses delivering high quality jobs, new social and cultural opportunities, improved and sustainable transport links and an active waterfront.

The four hectare Pydar site includes the former Carrick District Council offices, as well as the Viaduct car park and several businesses including Truro Bowl.

The project will bring neighbourhood living into the centre of the city with approximately 300 new homes, including affordable housing, multi generational housing and student accommodation, so different generations can live alongside each other in high quality accommodation which meets their needs. It will also provide innovative work and learning spaces supporting the creation of 500 new jobs.

Where is the site?

The 4-hectare site extends from the River Allen up to Pydar Street and from the Viaduct down towards the Cathedral approach, and includes the former Carrick District Council offices, as well as the Viaduct car park and several businesses including Truro Bowl.

Who is involved in the project?

The project is being led by Cornwall Council who are working with a range of partners to create a Masterplan for the site. These include architects PRP, Truro City Council,Truro BID, Kenwyn Parish Council, Falmouth University, Truro Chamber of Commerce Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership, and Poynton Bradbury Wynter Cole.

What is the background to the scheme?

The four-hectare site currently comprises a mix of car parks, office space, leisure and retail with a number of obsolete buildings. In November 2017 Cornwall Councillors voted to support the development of a number of regeneration schemes across Cornwall, one of which was Pydar. A Truro Place Shaping project was set up to work with the local community to identify what is great about the city; what is missing in the city and how it could be improved and in September 2018 the Council agreed to support the principle of developing Pydar Street.

Since then the Council has been working with Truro City Council, Kenwyn Parish Council, Truro BID, Truro Chamber of Commerce, and local residents’, commuters and businesses to create a site which builds on the ideas put forward by the local community and works for everyone.

Architects PRP were appointed earlier this year to develop a Masterplan for Pydar. They have been working with the Truro Place Shaping team to stage events and activities to enable people to have their say and help shape the plans for the scheme. Further events and activities are planned for the coming months.

What are the current proposals for the site?

The emerging plans include approximately 300 new homes, including affordable homes for local people, with multi generational housing and student accommodation; a new hotel and innovative work and learning spaces supporting the creation of 500 new jobs. These include The Hive, a digitally focused and entrepreneurial new innovative learning and living environment for Falmouth University that will help grow both a vibrant local community and Cornwall’s wider economy. Other proposals include the creation of a new riverside park with a highline walk, nature trails, climbing walls and other sports facilities; cafes, bars and restaurants; leisure and cultural facilities and a new community space for local people and organisations. One of the key aims of the project is to create new and improved links between Pydar and the city centre, local parks and the surrounding countryside. The emerging plans are designed to encourage the growing of food and flowers, to help draw wildlife from the parks and the River Allen into the community gardens and squares throughout the year.

How are you going to involve local people?

We want to involve as many people as possible in the development of Pydar and have been working with partners to stage a range of engagement activities, including workshops with and presentations and briefings to community groups, organisations, schools and colleges. Positive relationships have been established with a number of local community groups, including Rosedale Community Association, Friends of Daubuz Moor ad Daubuz Court Residents Association Further community events and activities will be continuing over the coming months.

Has the scheme got planning permission?

Architects PRP are working with the partners and the local community to develop a Masterplan for the site. By developing a coherent plan for the development which sets higher standards for placemaking and design, we can ensure that the scheme provides a sustainable community and a desirable and attractive place to live. The Masterplan will help deliver high quality, well designed housing, improved infrastructure and spaces for work and services that fit the needs of a diverse population. The aim is to complete the Masterplan in the Autumn ahead of applying for outline planning permission by the end of this 2019.

What kind of homes will you build?

Pydar will bring neighbourhood living into the centre of the city with approximately 300 new homes, including multi generational housing and student accommodation, so different generations can live alongside each other in high quality accommodation which meets their needs. There will be a mix of housing sizes, types and tenures to meet local needs rather than a bland “one size fits all” approach. This will include town houses and apartments, affordable homes for local people , and good quality Council Owned market rented homes. There will also be an option for self build homes on the site, with plans to work with the construction industry to give people the skills they need to build their own homes to live in on the site.

How much affordable housing will there be?

Pydar will be a community for everyone and will provide a wide range of homes for people of all needs and aspirations, including affordable housing and good quality Council Owned market rented homes.

What kind of leisure and community facilities will there be?

Feedback from the local community has identified a need for improving the city’s wet weather offer, and providing additional cultural and community facilities, including a multi-use community hub, a riverside park and a Plen -an-Gwarry, and improved public transport links.
Other proposals include a range of new indoor and outdoor activities, including an improved bowling alley, a children’s play zone, a digital gaming zone, cycling and walking routes, indoor bowls, gym and well-being facilities, including an outdoor gym and connections to existing parks and the River Allen

What is the timetable for the scheme?

Work on the masterplan is due to be completed within the next few months, with an application for outline planning permission expected to be submitted early 2020. The development will be phased over a number of years and the Council is working with partners to identify some exciting “meanwhile” uses for the site while the full scheme is being developed. Early ideas include festival spaces and pop up eating and seating ideas.

What will happen to the existing businesses/buildings on the site?

All the existing buildings on the site, including the former Carrick Council Offices, the Viaduct car park and the existing shops at the entrance to the site will be demolished. While the existing Truro Bowl building will also be demolished there will be a new bowling alley created as part of the new development.

How will you protect the environment?

The development of Pydar is a great opportunity to repair the damaged townscape and replace with a sympathetic development that protects and improves existing green spaces and celebrates the links to the river and the Carvedras Viaduct and Truro Cathedral. Pydar will promote and protect the local environment by improving physical and digital connectivity; conserving heritage assets; constructing streets and courtyards; increasing biodiversity and creating new habitats; using water in creative, innovative and efficient ways, designing energy efficient buildings and providing infrastructure for EV charging and supporting e-bike and e-car clubs. Proposals being developed as part of the masterplan include creating a new riverside park with a highline walk, nature trails and developing new and improved links between Pydar and the city centre, local parks and the surrounding countryside. The emerging plans are designed to encourage the creation of multi use green spaces for use by all ages which will support the growing of food and flowers to help draw wildlife from the parks and the River Allen into the community gardens and squares throughout the year.
The project is also committed to minimising pollution by making Pydar a zero food waste site, with potential proposals including using food waste as compost for community orchards and gardens, and roof gardens and producing food on the site. top market gardens. Environmental standards for buildings on the site will include reduced energy consumption, water efficiencies and use of renewable and low carbon technologies.

What about traffic congestion?

The site will play a key role in addressing Truro’s transport problems, with increased city centre living, new walking and cycling routes, improved public transport and redesigned parking helping to address traffic congestion and reduce commuter parking.

Our emerging vision sees a place which prioritises people over cars. Current plans are focused on reducing car use on and around the site, with minimal car parking at street level and a focus on pedestrians and cyclists. This will require development of alternative methods of transport – such as sustainable electric car and cycle clubs; real time travel data on the site; improved cycle links and connectivity, integrated rail and bus links. We are working with partners to create an effective Truro and Travel Transport Strategy which provides better cycle, bus and walking connections to provide a realistic and practical alternative to car use for accessing the city centre and other services.. The masterplan includes a number of features that promote good air quality such as provision for electric vehicles and public transport.

Will Pydar create jobs?

We recognise the need for jobs and will be working with partners to ensure that the scheme provides additional employment opportunities, with specific support for start-ups and growth for small and medium sized enterprises. Current proposals include providing collaborative and flexible work spaces to encourage start-ups and small businesses, a small budget hotel, small independent shops and commercial units, artisan makers and riverside eateries. This will help “future proof“ the development by providing employment opportunities in hotels, offices, university facilities and leisure centres rather than just relying on retail jobs. The scheme also includes the creation of the Hive, a new innovative digital innovation space led by Falmouth University which will attract research and development clusters, and high tech collaborations to the site, helping to grow both a vibrant local community and Cornwall’s wider economy Together these developments are expected to produce around 500 new jobs.

What about the impact on schools and health facilities?

We are very mindful of the impact of new developments on health and educational infrastructure. We are already working with existing schools and learning providers to consider what provision is needed to meet the needs of the people living at Pydar. We are also working with the Truro primary care practices, NHS Kernow and the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust to minimise the impact of the development on health services.

What about the impact on the existing city centre?

Pydar will be a place of positive activity that adds value to Truro and key magnets within the site. It will create training opportunities and apprenticeships, provide flexible and adaptable work-space for independent and local businesses to provide opportunities and learning hubs and community managed and owned renewable energy facilities, and support existing shops and businesses in the city centre by providing links with the new development. One of the key aims of the scheme is to maintain and protect the existing shops and businesses within Truro, and ensure that new development reinforces the strengths of the city centre. Creating a vibrant and sustainable community with more people living and working in the centre of the city will help promote shopping and leisure facilities, make the city more attractive to employers, reduce the need to travel and support the night time economy. Pydar will become a key destination point and gateway to Truro – linking the site to the city centre, the river and the cathedral with new walking and cycling routes and improved transport links, driving the city’s significance and prosperity for the future.

Cornwall has declared a Climate Emergency. How will Pydar reflect this?

It is our intention to create a well-connected community that is adaptable, resilient and fit for future living. We are working with partners to “future proof “ design so that it works for the next 30 plus years., with a focus on constructing low energy and low costs homes, promoting sustainable transport and increasing biodiversity by improving existing habitats and creating new ones.

What is the involvement of Falmouth University?

Falmouth University is one of the key partners in the Pydar Project. The current plans involve the provision of some student accommodation on the site and the creation of the Hive, a new innovative digital innovation space led by Falmouth University which will attract research and development clusters, and high tech collaborations to the site, helping to grow both a vibrant local community and Cornwall’s wider economy.

How does this development fit with proposals at Langarth and Garras Wharf?

Pydar is one of a series of wider regeneration projects being developed across Truro which are aimed at attracting people and businesses to live, work and visit the city. A Truro Place Shaping project was set up in 2017 to work with the local community to identify what is great about the city; what is missing in the city and how it could be improved. Since then Cornwall Council has been working with Truro City Council, Kenwyn Parish Council, Truro BID, Truro Chamber of Commerce, and local residents’, commuters and businesses to create a site which builds on the ideas put forward by the local community and works for everyone. The emerging proposals are also being considered as part of the refresh of the Truro and Kenwyn Neighbourhood Plan .

I would like to buy a home, how do I do that?

Please get in touch by email or phone, and a member of the team will add you to our database. It is unlikely that homes will be launching in the next two years, but we will be happy to contact you as soon as plans have progressed to that stage.

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